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COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 



COLLEGE 

OF 

PHYSICIANS 

AND 

SURGEONS 



1976 



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FOR OF THE ' ^OST HIGH CO^ IETH HEALING 

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WILLIAM J. McGILL, Ph. D., L.H.D., LL.D. 
(HON.) 

President, Columbia University 



administration 




10 



PAUL A. MARKS, M.D. 
Vice-President for Health Sciences 





DONALD F. TAPLEY, M.D. 
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 




ANN S. PETERSON, M.D. 
Associate Dean for Student 
Affairs 



MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1976 

It is a yreat pleasure to see the return of the class yearbook at P&S. 
We are all indebted to the editorial staff who have devoted so much 
time and effort to rnsure the success of this book. 

Many years from now, as you reminisce about friends and P&S, this 
yearbook will have deeper meaning than it does today. I hope that your 
memories will be pleasant ones and that the intervening years will have 
brought you good health, happiness and success. 

Ann S. Peterson, M.D. 



12 




pre-clinical years 



13 



a 
n 
a 
t 
o 
m 




Dammit, Susie, can't you get Luckett over here now? 




i 




DR. RAY C. HENRIKSON: Cockfai/ parfy?? 



DR. ERNEST APRIL: Hmnim 
year's class is 36% women. 



let's see, next 



14 




fU)..A\D. 

HOUSE. Ph.D. 





Jim Almas after the first lab practical. 



DR. PHILIP BRANDT: The epiglottis is like a garbage 
can lid. 



15 







DR. CHARLES ELY: Anatomy is a laugh! 




DR. ALFONSO SOLIMENE: This is my primitive ventral 
surface. Let's see yours. 




DR. A.S. DHAWAN: You haff athked me to dithect out 
the grrreat thaphenouth vein. 



16 




DR. MELVIN MOSS: And I have seen these so-colled 
patients, quite literally hurl themselves off the top of the 
roof of tfie Black Building! 





ALBERT: For myself, I've picked the table in the corner 
with the sunshine. 



DR. GERARD PEREIRA: Eet iz zee T ce//s fhaf have that je 
ne sais quoi. 




neuroanatomy 



DR. CHARLES NOBACK: Now, what was / saying? 




DR. MALCOLM B. CARPENTER: It never fails: whatever / do today Charlie will undo tomorrow. 



18 



physiology 




DR. MERO NOCENTh First comes MIT, next comes DIT 
. . ., then there's triiodothyronine. 




DR. JOHN TAGGART: You, sir, epitomize that ineffable 
quality of florid insecurity so characteristic of the TYPICAL 
first-year student. 




DR. LOUIS CIZEK: I told you to watch that total body water! 







DR. SHU CHIEN: / did NOT inject myself with Dextran to 
measure my circulation time. 



DR. RAIMOND EMMERS: And now for fhe unveiling of 
the only afferent walley in captivity. 



20 




DR. WILLIAM NASTUK: No, the sodium pump is not hy- 
draulically operated. 



DR. DAVID SCHACHTER: I've always got that gut feeling. 




21 




DR. ALVIN KRASNA: Wonno see my egg trick? 




o 
c 
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e 
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y 



DR. PHILIP FEIGELSON: Negative. 



DR. SEYMOUR LIEBERMAN: Did you hear the 
one about Methyl-Ethyl Chicken wire? 





r ^ 



DR. PARITHYCHERY SRINIVASAN: Would you like to hear the one about the Rabbi or the Frog 
and the Scorpion? 



23 




DR. HARRY ROSE: Do you always wear those silver hoots, Mr. Kremberg? 



microbiology 





DR. HAROLD GINSBERG: Dr. Rose warned me about you 
guys. Now for the last time there will be NO multiple choice 
exoms this semester. 



DR. ELVIN KABAT: And then / injected dextran into 
myself. You'll find it all in Structural Concepts. 




DR. HERBERT ROSENKRANZ: Guildenstern maybe, but 
not me! 




DR. PAUL ELLNER: And the fly leaves the outhouse, goes 
through the hole in the screen and lands on Mrs. Smith's 
pie. 



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DR. DONALD HARTER: Some of me nicesf people I know 
have Scrapie. 



25 





DR. COUNCILMAN MORGAN: You want me to show 
them my Councilman body? 



DR. BERNARD ERLANGER: / relax with the music of Louis and 
the Stingrays. 



How nice! A note from the Mi- 
crobiology Department .... 




26 




DR. LESTER GELLER: If you're nice fo me /'// let you 
talk to Dr. King. 



pathology 





DR. DONALD WEST KING: And now, point four seconds on the 
Class of 76. 




DR. S. RAYMOND GAMBINO AND DR. A. WHITLEY BRANWOOD: And now the next contestant. 



27 




DR. ROBERT PASCAL: The nice thing about being a Pathologist is that nobody ex- 
pects you to wear a tie. 





DR. WILLIAM BLANC: / wonder what Virchow would do now? 



DR. H. JOACHIM WIGGER: Mein Gott! Not an- 
other foreskin! 





DR. RAFFAELE LATTES: I'm afraid I don't yodel. 



DR. KARL PERZIN: Friends, please don't sit on my spoons. 



Egypt was more exciting. 




29 




DR. MARIANNE WOLFF: Hmm . . . I wonder how many will show up~T&day? 




Nieves or Nevus, that is the question. 



30 



pharmacology 




DR. NORMAN KAHN: Almas through Koster in Amphitheater 1 . Kremberg through 
Zoltick in Amphitheater 8. And I'll see Miss Salmon in my office! 





DR. BRIAN HOFFMAN: And occasionally Norman allows me to i 
part my wisdom to the second year class. 



DR. WILBUR SAWYER: Yes, that's one of the 
more interesting effects of alcohol on ADH 
secretion. 



31 




DR. FREDERICK HOFMANN: Basically, your acceptance 
here was a case of mistaken identity. 





DR. EISA GIARDINA: No, Cm not related to the Lamblias! 







# ' .> ' .;. V ... >V V * ..; •? .. ' •:• .''■' 



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/f's the REAL thing! 



32 




DR. MICHAEL KATZ: And if Dr. Despommier tries to scoop me on another punchline, he'll find himself lecturing at Down- 
state next week. 



parasitology 




WW's gefilte fish? 



33 



genetics 




DR. DOROTHY WARbuKTON: And which one 
are you missing? 




DR. ROBERT KROOTH: And this is merely a case of non-dis/unch'on. 




DR. SOL SPIEGELMAN: / want to congratulate your classmate Bill 
Peters for volunteering to be immunized with mouse mammary tu- 
mor virus. 



34 



P&S Club 



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clinical years 



43 



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DR. CHARLES RAGAN: In between smokes I have a lot to say at Chief- 
of-Service rounds. 





DR. HENRY ARANOW, Jr.: They sent in the second 
string. 



DR. THOMAS Q. MORRIS: I'll be glad to show you your 
evaluations. But tell me, are you easily offended? 





SB £*u 



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DR. ANDREW FRANTZ: No, Bill, a slightly elevated Pro- 
lactin level does not warrant 3 months of bedrest in 
Majorca. 



DR. HAMILTON SOUTHWORTH: No, scratching out the 
liver has nothing to do with pruritus. 




DR. REJANE HARVEY: What do you mean, my ST segments are sagging? 





DR. STANLEY E. BRADLEY: Don t jump! 



. . . and the Attending still said I was ill-equipped to 
be a physician. 




DR. ELLIOT OSSERMAN: Take it like a man! 




' . 4 

I 



, 




)R. ROBERT CANFIELD: In a 67 year old woman with a 
erum calcium of 1 5, idiopathic hypercalcemia of infancy 
s not port of fhe differential. 





DR. ANDRE COURNAND: I'm still living ... off my Nobel 
Prize money. 



DR. DANA ATCHLEY: Would you like me to autograph 
your Atchley form? 



47 




DRS. J. THOMAS BIGGER, JR. and ROBERT HEISSENBUTTEL: Hmmm . . . the heart is indeed a wire. 




DR. GLENDA GARVEY: Untitled 



DRS. RICHARD RIFKIND and ARTHUR BANK: Do 
your lymph nodes ache offer you drink Johnnie 
Walker Black? 





DR. VINCENT BUTLER: / wonder if I'll ever find "Big Bursa"! 




DR. WENDELL HATFIELD: Where are my three sons? 





r 



DR. GERARD TURINO: I'm gonna make you an offer you DR. PETER CALDWELL: / don't buy the yearbook, 

can't refuse! 



50 





DR. NORMA BRAUN: This is the lafest in Chinese DR. HARVEY SCHNEIER: This write-up is fine. But it wasn't 

backscratchers. really necessary to ask about the sex life of the patient's 

teen-age daughter. 





V 



t \ 





DR. JOHN LOE8: Bob, you must be mistaken. That is not the ghost of my father standing 
over there by the centrifuge. 



51 




DR. DONALD HOIUB- PTU before RA1 before K) before OR before RIP! 





DR. RICHARD RIVLIN: Unforfunafe/y, even fhe vitamins 
can'f keep you from getting old and crocfiefy. 



DR. EDGAR LEIFER: What do you mean I'm unnerving you by 
constantly interrupting your presentation? 




A> 



\ j^; 




DR. GERALD THOMPSON: Even / have to pay off the driver of the Harlem shuttle bus! 





DR. JOHN LINDENBAUM: Anyone who insists on com- 
paring my vocalization to Ed Sullivan might be a can- 
didate for intrathecal methotrexate! 



Demonstration of proper technique for gram staining one's 
fingers. 



53 




DR. HAROLD NEU: / cant believe that you 
don't know the percentage of sensitivities of 
Erysipelothrix insidiosa to streptomycin! 




54 




DR. ROBERT WHITLOCK: Tetrahydocannabinol isn't bad 
at all. Please pass the potato chips. 





DR. JOSEPH SWEETING: Enemas are the purgers of 
the sou/. 




DR. CARWILE LeROY: The most common naturally occur- 
mg graft is the fetus, the second is New York City. 



DR. JAY BROWN: Did you hear about the streaker on 
Columbia's campus who was wearing nothing but a 
hotter monitor? 



55 







i 

III 





DR. KEITH REEMTSMA: A car accident? Get Dr. Hardy/ 



s 
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r 

y 




DR. THOMAS KING: You don't hove to spit in the peritoneum. 






*&&t£j** 



\ 



-\ 



} 



DR. GEORGE CRICKELAIR: Other than your nose, what 
else do you want fixed? 



DR. FRANK GUMP: Chicken Gumpo is my favorite soup. 




Gosh that's exciting, Dick 



57 




DR. FREDERIC HERTER: Cut! 





DR. ROBERT BERTSCH: Are you sure you want me to read 
your evaluation? 



DR. PHILIP WIEDEL: If you re fat, forty, fertile, and fe- 
male, then you need a prophylactic cholecystectomy. 



58 



DR. JOSEPH BUDA: /'// smile, but I won't sit cross-legged. 






DR. JAMES MALM: Seems that we're o quart short. 



59 





DR. ALFRED MARKOWITZ: Do cows hove cholecystitis? DR. FERDINAND McALLISTER: My vessels runneth over. 




DR. ALFRED JARETZKI: I've always thought it ironic that a coin lesion usually winds up cost- 
ing $1500. 




DR. DONALD HEIMLICH: And these are our honeymoon pictures. 




DR. ARTHUR VOORHEES: And this is the same "mug 
shot" that I sent out on my applications for surgical 
internship. 




DR. DAVID HABIF: Portrait of the surgeon as a young 
man. 



61 





DR. KENNETH FORDE: Yet, who would have 
thought the old man to have had so much 
blood in him. 

(Act V, Scene I "Macbeth") 



DR. FREDERICK BOWMAN: Sure, you can scrub with me, 
but just don't ask any stupid questions . . . In fact, don't 
ask any questions! 




62 




DR. HENRIK BENDIXEN: Who told you that anesthesiologists just sit on stools passing gas? 



anesthesiology 




DR. MIECZYSLAW FINSTER: If all else fails you can al- 
ways try Rrahms lullaby. 




orthopedics 



\ 



DR. FRANK STINCHFIELD: 

When / gef older losing my hair. 
Many years from now. 
Will you still be sending me a Valentine 
Birthday greetings bottle of wine. 
If I'd been out till quarter to three 
Would you lock the door, 
Will you still need me, will you still feed me, 
When I'm sixty-five. 

(without permission from the Beatles) 






DR. DAVID ANDREWS: Another clinical example of shift- 
ing dullness. 



DR. HAROLD DICK: Talipes who? 




DRS. ALEXANDER GARCIA and HUGO KEIM: You know, Alex, 
scoliosis is my business . . . my only businessl 



65 




DR. C. ANDREW BASSETT: / find bones really 
electrifying. 



DR. ROBERT CARROLL: What, will these hands ne'er be 
clean? 

(Act V, Scene I "Macbeth") 




DR. NAS EFTEKHAR: Sometimes / wonder 
what all those little old ladies are doing 
with their femoral necks at 3 A.M. 



66 




urology 



DR. JOHN LATTIMER: The three sexual ages 
of o human male are tri-weekly, try weekly, 
and try, weakly. 




DRS. MYRON ROBERTS and NICHOLAS ROMAS: We can't wait to get our hands on Gerry Ford's prostate. 



67 




DRS. PETER PUCHNER ond STANLEY BRA- 
HAM: Hey Stan, con you say, "Peter Puchner 
picked a peck of pickled prostates" three 
times rapidly. 




DR. RALPH VEENEMA: No, / don't take my Thio-Tepa with two lumps of sugar. 





DR. MICHAEL WECHSLER: I'm not quite sure what Mas- 
ters and Johnson would say about that. 



DR. MEYER MELICOW: Come into my office and I'll show 
you my etchings. 








Osr-nt; * nd d<xbj"ou( -/u+u/e *- 



/ft. /??• HniJbc<s~ *\ it 



69 




DR. LEWIS ROWLAND: Everyone tries to topple the Chief 
at Rowland's Rounds! 



neurology 





DR. AUDREY PENN: Show me your muscles. 



DR. H. HOUSTON MERRITT: It's only $5.00 extra to have 
an AUTOGRAPHED copy of my book. 



70 



_ 


I 

71 i 




M 





DR. RICHARD MASLAND: / think a little phenobarbital 
might help you. 




DR. SID GILMAN: The cerebellum is the heart of the 
universe. 



UD) 




DR. LINDA LEWIS: Sometimes I think you have a worn out 
spirochete for a synapse in your parietal lobe. 




DR. EARL ZIMMERMAN: My research involves using 
chicken soup in replacing losses in CSF rhinorrhea. 




DR. STANLEY FAHN: / use to hove tics myself, but hahperidol 
really helps. 




DR. JOHN BRUST, Jr.: If the patient can open the door, walk in, shake my hand and sit down, he passes 
the neurological exam. 





DR. DANIEL SCIARRA: I like to think of the spinal cord as 
o tube of vermicelli. 



DR. WILLIAM ISGREEN: Would you like to see a chorei- 
form donee? 




t I 



/ 



DR. ARNOLD GOLD: Now stick out your tongue/ 




DR. ABE CHUTORIAN: took deep info my eyes! 




What did you say about 
kneeding a jerk? 




DR. EDWARD SCHLESINGER: / feel lucky today. Let's 
drill. 




neurological 
surgery 




DR. EDGAR HOUSEPIAN-. So you think you need a frontal 
(ototomy. 



DR. W. JOST MICHELSON: Off with his caharium! 



75 





If only he had kept his eyes opened! 



DR. LESTER MOUNT: The class of 1976 has some of the best 
gray matter I've seen. 




pediatrics 





DR. ROBERT MELLINS: / think you re a prod- 
uct of a V/Q mismatch. 



DR. RICHARD BEHRMAN: Next week's Grand Rounds will be on 
"How big trees from tittle acorns grow." 




DRS. JOHN DRISCOLL and L. STANLEY JAMES: We get upsef over Ziffle things! 



77 





DR. WELTON GERSONY: Maybe if you didn't press so 
hard with your stethoscope he wouldn't get circumoral 
cyanosis. 



DR. WILLIAM BAUMAN: / like this new invitation for the 
faculty home dinners . . . B.Y.O.B. 





DR. SUSAN GORDON: No, she doesn't have the strawberry tongue of niacin deficiency. She just finished a 
cherry lollipop. 



78 




DR. MARTIN LORIN: Put me down for fifty on Gotcha Baby in the fifth. 





DR. ARTHUR BLOOM: You look like you need some gen- 
etic counseling! 



-"</ 



DR. ROBERT WINTERS: Why don't you just read it in my 
Bible. 



79 




DR. RUTH HARRIS: I've always dreamed of having my name in bill-lights. 




DRS. CATHERINE DeANGELIS and MARGARET McHUGH: Did you say that obese child had Pra- 
der-Willi Syndrome or that his name was Willie Prader? 






DRS. AKIRA MORISHIMA and JENNIFER BELL: Would 
you like to see our growth curves? 



DR. RUSSELL ASNES: / seem to be getting some tonal in- 
terference here. 




DR. MARY ANN COLENDA: Well, fellas, it's time for an Enfamil break. 





DR. MARTIN NASH: / actually prefer playing backgam- 
mon to playing with acid-base balance. 



DR. JANE PITT: And these data are the results of my hu- 
man breast milk experiments. 



82 





DR. JAMES WOLFF: My protocol for Bloody Mary is: to 
one fifth vodka add one can tomato juice, Vi cup lemon 
juice, one tsp. each of Worcestershire sauce and freshly 
ground Cytoxan. 




DR. NEILS LOW: Before you leave Blythedale, I want to show you our super-duper coin- 
operated wheelchair. 



83 



radiology 




DR. WILLIAM SEAMAN: Never Lower Tilde's Pants, Mother 
Might Come Home.' 





DR. DAVID FOLLETT: When ISN'T on IVP indicated? 



DR. KENT ELLIS: Do / really have to give those first-year 
lectures again? 




DR. GUY POTTER: Zap! You're sterile! 





DR. FRIEDA FELDMAN: It's that "Ditzl" Jaretzki on a 
White Horse! 



DR. RUTH GUTTMAN: I'm noted for my super voltage. 



85 





DR. WALTER BERDON: It's not Suntan. It's X-ray tan! 




DR. JOHN AUSTIN: To gef a good apical lordotic, the ra- 
diologist should be in the missionary position. 




86 




DR. RAYMOND VAN DE WIELE: But, is she menstruating? 



obstetrics and gynecology 




Near Honors technique for forceps delivery. 



87 




DR. SUSAN WILLIAMSON: Gracious Grandmother to 
Growing Gynecologists. 



DR. SOLAN CHAO: Aging begins at conception. 




DR. EDWARD BOWE: After this Bard Hall musical is over, / think /'// try my hand at some gynecology again. 



88 






DR. W. DUANE TODD: Jusf because you think the delivery room isn't properly equipped 
doesn't give you the right to do a high forceps delivery with a five iron! 





DR. ROY PETRIE: Dr. Late Deceleration. 



DR. GILBERT VOSBURGH: With some deliveries the 
Smelley maneuver is just that. 



89 



$aiifS§ 






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/ 






And what have you been doing lately? 



rehabilitation medicine 





DR. JOHN DOWNEY: Would you believe that the Harlem Globe Trotters were once on Neuro 8? 



ir 




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I 



91 






DR. ROBERT DARLING: How do you like my mask-like DR. STANLEY MYERS: This is our floor model, 

fades? 

SPECIAL SALE-Manual of Orthopedic Surgery, regularly $2.50, now ONLY $3.95 plus tax! 






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j*OBBr// 

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bible; 



7 



ophthalmology 




DR. CHARLES CAMPBELL: Someday I hope my fundus pic- 
tures are as good as my soup. 




DR. ROBERT ELLSWORTH: So it's all set— the Salt & Pepper at 3 P.M. on Friday. 



93 




» £ 




DR. A. GERARD DeVOE: The Key to success in this business is contacts. 



dermatology 




DR. LEONARD HARBER: / hope your camera flash isn't 
photosensitizing . 








DRS. SWEENEY and ALEXANDER YOUNG: / think you're sfrerching it a bit to include the 
Eh/ers-Dan/os Syndrome in the differential. 



95 



otolaryngology 




DR. ROBERT HUI: Bleeding always stops. 





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I 




DR. MILOS BASEK: We've gof a special package deal 
this month only— you pay full price for your T&A, and then 
you get your D&C free. 



\ 



DRS. LAWRENCE SAVETSKY and FRANK MIGNOGNA: 
It's not that I'm camera shy, but my malpractice insurance 
just ran out. 




DR. LAWRENCE KOLB: Surgeons know nothing but do everything; internists 
know everything but do nothing; psychiatrists know nothing and do nothing; 
and pathologists know everything and do everything, but too late! 



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VC 5 




DR. SAMUEL PERRY III: They call me the 8 A.M. Johnny Carson. 





Role identification. 



DR. ANNE BERNSTEIN: Actually the Nutcracker Suite is a ballet 
inspired by basic Freudian thought. 



98 




DR. RICHARD FRIEDMAN: Yes, I'd figure it would cost you 
about $2.50 to see fhese some tapes on 42nd Street. 



DR. WINSLOW HUNT: We psychiatrists are not 
what we're cracked up to be. 







Manhattan State 



99 




DR. STEPHEN ROSENBERG: The prime requisite for your Community 
Health Project oral presentation is that it keeps us awake. 



public 
health 




100 



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101 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 
EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE 



ML07R Suhlnternshin In Internal Medicine 



.Class of 197 6_ 



Clerkship _ 



Electiv 



Preclinical. 



Dates of Assignment March , 1975 



Please type a narrative evaluation of the student's performance, indicating the settings in which the performance was observed and the 
persons (laborato-y instructors, preceptors, attendings, house staff) who contributed comments. When possible, clinical courses should 
include the following areas of evaluation in the narrative: 1 ) intellectual capacity and ability to synthesize, 2) fund of general medical 
knowledge, 3) growth in fund of knowledge of discipline, 4) performance level (with attention to consistency and performance at the 
level expected), 5) quality of histories and physicals, 6) quality of presentations, 7) judgment, 8) professional habits and attitudes 
(including honesty, industry, initiative, responsibility, handling of criticism), and 9) relationships with patients and their families, 
fleers and superiors. Any other observations appropriate to the discipline should be included. The narrative should conclude with a 
summary statement on performance and a description of the total performance, employing one of the following adjectives 
unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good (very good), excellent or outstanding. Preclinical evaluations should provide as much information 
in ihese categories as the structure of the course and the method of observation will permit. 



duri 
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pro-, 

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lex 

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i ur • 
to ha 
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e one 

e rmq , 
ories 
on sin 



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rhp in 
~onsid 



served a subinrernship on the Kedlcal Service 
ch , 1975. The student- was judged by the 

and rh» senior resident-, Dr. 
nate Intellectual canacity of a moron, 
red to he an average student compared to his 
r. f| HUP ftind of knowledpe grew rnnsidorsMv 

mon*-h neriod to the point where he was able to use 
1 tarpon and »fiip«>d familiarity with at least Ten 
His Performance level was unusually consistent, 
and nhvsicals were pood, demonstrating a vivid 
d ramblins> prose form. 



The '-.tudent's nresentations were direct, to the no'.nt, and 
t n >vt-^*m»lv nonr tastn». Clinical judgements were nresented with 
confidence and in oonvincine, style, thoueh often not to the natients' 
henefit. His most orjevous fault was in turntnp a case over to 
t-H*> S'ur<»eon<=, Mr, Ql B uas usually honest, though he once 

stole a quarter fron an old ladv, He was quite industrious, had 
no initiative to sneak of, and handled criticism in a unique manner, 
-r was prone to \ svehomotor seizures vh*n informed of his nrozress, 
\'f vould su^pest a workun for a possible temnoral lobe lesion, 
related well to families and patients alike. 

In summarv his overall oerformanre was very pood vo excellent. 



Assistant Clinical 1'rofessor 
fiTie" "" of "Medicine 



N*>di cine 
n.-(i.mniein 

Q/30/75 



Roosevelt 

Hospital 

Final Rating for the Course 



Fail. 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN COPY 



electives 








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alumni highlights 

for the class of 1976: 
america's bicentennial year 




King's College around 1 770 

Your medical school, founded in 1 767, awarded the 
first M.D. degree in colonial America to Robert Tucker, 
the one-man class of 1770. 

Our colonial civilization was going through the pains of 
giving birth to a new nation during the same years that 
gave birth to medical education in America. Benjamin 
Franklin was an assistant accoucheur for both! 

During the 206 years from 1 770 (with its class of one) 
to 1 976 (your group of 1 45), we have bestowed 1 6,275 
plus 145 M.D. degrees. You are now an alumnus of a 
medical school which, with all modesty, can say that it 
has been a leader in the development of medical educa- 
tion and practice, not only in America, but in the entire 
world. 

It all started in 1 731 , when John Bard of Philadelphia, 
age 15, became apprenticed to John Kearsley, M.D., one 
of the few physicians in the new world who actually had 
an M.D. degree. Later, as a practitioner in Philadelphia, 
he came to the attention of Benjamin Franklin, who was 
favorably impressed and recommended to Bard that he 
go to New York City, where there was a good opening 
due to the recent deaths of three local doctors. 



In 1 746, Bard took this advice and was soon a leading 
New York physician. 

John Bard's son, Samuel, after graduating from King's 
College, went to Edinburgh to obtain his M.D. degree. 
There he became a close friend to a fellow student from 
Philadelphia, John Morton. During their European studies, 
they worked out a set of lofty standards for medical 
schools, as well as requirements for admission and gradu- 
ation. They returned to America at the same time, each 
determined to start a medical school in his home town. 
Both were successful. 

During those early years, the "Weekly Society of Gen- 
tlemen," which Benjamin Franklin had assisted John Bard 
in organizing, worked hard for the establishment of a 
medical school at King's College. At the same time, 
Franklin was also trying to get a medical school started in 
Philadelphia. (Franklin, now over 60, suffered from blad- 
der stones and was occasionally in New York consulting 
John Jones, the foremost lithotomist in the colonies.) 

Samuel Bard, now in practice with his father, was de- 
termined that a medical school be started and, insisted 
that its requirements for receiving an M.D. be just as high 



112 




3. Young men should come to the study of medicine 
with a liberal education. 

4. The curriculum should follow a graded order from 
anatomy to clinical instruction and experience. 

5. Teachers should have time to experiment and search 
for the secrets of nature. 

The first faculty consisted of: 

Samuel Clossy, M.D., Anatomy 

Peter Middleton, M.D., Pathology and Physiology 

John Jones, M.D., Surgery 

James Smith, M.D., Chemistry and Materia Medica 

Samuel Bard, M.D., Theory and Practice of Medicine 

John V.B. Tennant, M.D., Midwifery 

lpublished in Fothergill's Medical Observations and In- 
quiries, 1760. (Cour+esfy of the New York Academy of 
Medicine J 



DR. SAMUEL BARD 

as those in Edinburgh. When the King's College Medical 
School was founded in 1767, he, at age 25, was the first 
professor of the practice of physik. His father, John Bard, 
still the leading physician in the area and a prime worker 
for the medical school, but lacking an M.D. degree, was 
not mentioned for the faculty. In fact, history does not 
record much more about him, as his son's star rose, ex- 
cept that he remained behind the scenes using his in- 
fluence to help both his son and the new medical school. 

The first star in our alumni crown must go to John Bard, 
our spiritual godfather, a man who, in 1759 — a century 
before anesthesia and a half century before McDowell's 
famous "first" abdominal operation to remove an ovarian 
cyst — diagnosed and successfully removed an ectopic 
pregnancy: the first such surgery documented; in the 
world. He was perhaps the most influential person in spar- 
king the establishment of our medical school. 

The second star must go to his son Samuel — the out- 
standing leader of our first Medical Faculty. His day- 
book, which graces the exhibit case in Bard Hall, contains 
notations of his visits to all the familiar New York fam- 
ilies, as well as to General Washington. 

The standards set up by Drs. Samuel Bard and John 
Morgan while students at Edinburgh and used in founding 
King's College School of Medicine and the Philadelphia 
Medical College sound interestingly familiar: 

1 . A medical school ought to be an integral part of a 
college or university. 

2. Hospital instruction should form an integral part of 
instruction in a medical school. 




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'.'..•^■■'■■u 



113 




Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 1H76 



John Jones, the next candidate, is perhaps the best proto- 
type for the "stars" of our early alumni and faculty. 

1 . He was as highly trained as any medical man 
could be in those days. 

2. He was our first Professor of Surgery. 

3. He drew the plans for building the first New York 
Hospital. 

4. He was the leading lithotomist in the colonies and 
is credited with at least 150 such procedures. 

5. In 1775, he wrote and published the first book 
on medicine in America entitled, "Plain, Con- 



cise, Practical Remarks on the Treatment of 
Wounds and Fractures." 

6. As an avocation, he was interested in mete- 
orological observations and, for ten years before 
the war, prepared them for the press. 

7. When the Revolutionary War broke out and 
King's College was closed, Drs. Smith and Jones 
were the only two physicians of the medical fac- 
ulty to go with the Continental Army. 

8. As a patriot, he wrote, "Every man has it in his 
power to contribute something. If he cannot cure 
the fatal disease of this unfortunate country, it 
will at least afford him some consolation to have 
poured a little balm into a bleeding wound." 

9. He established camp hospitals for the Continen- 
tal Army and became George Washington's per- 
sonal physician. 
10. After the war, Jones moved to Philadelphia, 
where he continued to teach and practice until his 
death in 1 791 . It is to be noted that his patients, 
President George Washington and Benjamin 
Franklin, lived in Philadelphia at this time too. 

The first medical school entrance and graduation re- 
quirements were so stiff that, by the time the Revolution- 
ary War forced the closing of the school, only a few M.D. 
degrees had been awarded. 

Emerging from the war as part of the New York State 




The first home of the College of Physicians and Surgeons (the house marked X) Park Place, N.Y. in 1 83 1 . The 
cupola of Columbia College is visible in the right background. * 




University, the King's College Medical School was re- 
opened as the "Columbia College, Faculty of Medicine." 
Instruction was resumed in 1 784 using similarly high stan- 
dards. They were so high that from 1784 to 1791 there 
were no graduates. The population of New York was ex- 
ploding and physicians were in great demand, but Colum- 
bia would not lower the standards set up by Bard, and 
there were not enough scholars in the colonies to qualify. 
The medical school in Philadelphia was having the same 
problem. Thus, the only two medical schools in the new 
world were not providing enough trained physicians. 

In 1 807, the New York State Regents lowered the aca- 
demic bars to make medical education more available. 
Columbia would not accept this— so some of her medical 
faculty joined with several equally highly trained physi- 
cians with M.D. degrees and started a rival school which 
they called the College of Physicians and Surgeons. It 
opened with less rigid requirements and graduated eight 
men in 1811. 

From 1767 to 1813 Columbia had awarded only 35 
M.D. degrees. In 1 8 1 4, it gave up and amalgamated with 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons. There were 70 
students in the first combined class and 192 in the school 
by 1817. The "combined faculty" of the new P&S was 
the finest that could be put together in America — a stan- 
dard which we have strived to maintain through these two 
centuries. 

Dr. David Hosack had been on both Columbia and P&S 
faculties, and became Professor of Clinical Medicine of 
the combined staff. He was a dynamic teacher, but the 



storm petrel of his time. Dr. Hosack deserves a star be- 
cause he started the little botany garden on land later 
given to P&S and which Columbia University still owns. 
Despite several vigorous efforts to "unload" it on various 
church groups, today it is the enormously valuable site of 
Rockefeller Center, a source of lifesaving university 
income. 

In the galaxy of early P&S graduates, Valentine Mott 
stands out. In 1806, at the age of 21, he received his 
M.D. degree from Columbia and was elected, when 29, 
to the chair of Principles and Practice of Surgery at the 
new P&S. He was an early president of the New York 
Academy of Medicine and belonged to surgical societies 
in London, Brussels, Paris and Ireland. Mott's biographer 
declared that he was a prodigious worker, performing a 
greater number of important operations (including 1 90 
lithotomies) than any surgeon who ever lived. It is inter- 
esting to observe the difference in surgical activity of our 
predecessors. There were no surgical specialists and Mott 
attempted any surgery that needed to be done on the hu- 
man body. During the Civil War, he prepared instructions 
for first aid to wounded soldiers on the field of battle and 
a paper on the use of anesthetics for army surgeons. Our 
present professorship in surgery is named after him. 

Between 1810 and 1840, twenty-six new unregulated 
medical schools were started in the United States with 
forty-seven more by 1 876, the American Centennial year. 




Dr. David Hosack 



115 



Before this dismal situation was brought under control, as 
a result of the Flexner report of 1910, over 457 medical 
schools had sprung up in this country. They were mostly 
"diploma mills." 

The fabulous Flexner report which helped bring the situ- 
ation under control, mentions Columbia on twenty-one oc- 
casions. Reading it makes one proud to be a P&S gradu- 
ate. It credits the P&S alumni, under the leadership of Dr. 
Francis Delafield, for establishing at P&S the first medical 
school laboratory, quickly emulated by Bellevue and later 
by Johns Hopkins. It said: "The dispensary attached to 
P&S represents the school dispensary at its best." 

In reading about the graduates of each class in succes- 
sive years, it becomes apparent that they were influential 
on policy making bodies guiding the affairs of the city, 
the state, and the nation. Many were active in fields other 
than medicine. In 1 858, Dr. Frederick Shrady (the first of 
several P&S Shradys) was the founder and long-time edi- 




Gulli Lindh Muller, M.D. * 







Dr. Valentine Mott 

tor of the Medical Record, apparently the first viable 
American medical periodical. In 1 857 came the first of 
several Lamberts. One, Samuel W. Lambert, was Dean, 
1 904- 1919. He perhaps deserves a star as a great medi- 
cal teacher and administrator, but we shall award him one 
for being the Dean under whom the first women were ad- 
mitted to P&S in 1917. A big star must go to Dr. Gulli 
Lindh Muller who was the most influential in overcoming 
the Dean's resistance to women in medicine— she was in 
the first group of women admitted and graduated at the 
head of the Class of 1921. In 1864 we found Dr. Ja- 
neway, who became Professor of Pharmacology and 
Pathological Anatomy and later Commissioner of Health. 
Williard Parker gained so much fame that the Hospital for 
Infectious Diseases in New York City was named after 
him. We know that while President Grant was dying 



slowly of carcinoma of the throat, P&S graduate Has- 
brouch Shrady tried to make his last days more comfort- 
able as the ex-president hurried to complete his memoirs 
in order to leave his destitute family with a saleable book. 
We know of the fame of surgeon McCosh, after whom the 
large surgical amphitheatre in the original medical center 
was named, and we still use the "Otis" urethrotome. 

There are pages of distinguished older alumni, too nu- 
merous to list, and it is still too early to know which of the 
present generation will be tagged for fame. However, it 
can give one a start of pleasure to go into the highest of- 
fices of medical government and medical policy-making 




organizations, to discover that there are P&S graduates 
at every level. The P&S family gains an additional dimen- 
sion, if you also regard your teachers from the Presby- 
terian Hospital programs as fellow alumni. 

Perhaps the most impressive aspect of being a P&S 
alumnus is the fact that no matter where you go, any- 
where in the world, in medical circles, you will be pleased 
with the number of influential doctors who come and in- 
troduce themselves as fellow P&S alumni. When Benjamin 
Franklin came up here 200 years ago for advice about his 
bladder stone and prostate, he knew what he was doing. 
John K. Lattimer, M.D., Sc.D. 



"Printed with permission from the P&S Quarterly. 




Ethan Allen descendant John K. Lattimer captures Fort 
Ticonderoga from the British, "In the Name of the 
Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress,'' during 
the bicentennial reenactment on May 10, 1975. 



117 



Daniel B. Carr 
Thomas J. Castellano 
Jean M. Chin 
Catherine Eng 
Nancy E. Epstein 
Patricia E. Gilhooly 
Bert M. Glaser 
Stephen E. Glinick 
Andrew M. Goldmann 
Jerome E. Groopman 
Jonathan D. Kaunitz 
Jose M. Marcal 
Harry J. Marshall III 



alpha omega alpha 



Marguerite B. McDonald 
James W. McNally 
Dennis S. Miura 
Andrew J. Packer 
Malcolm C. Phillips 
Clifford M. Ratner 
Jane E. Salmon 
Robert L. Schiffman 
Robert T. Schoen 
Robert W. Schultz 
Steven A. Stuchin 
Kamehameha K.M. Wong Jr. 



one viewpoint 




Cynthia and Renard Charity 



Attitudes toward women in medicine have changed greatly in 
recent years. The enrollment of women in medical school hos in- 
creased yearly, along with that of Black students. Yet the mar- 
ried woman with a family is still looked upon as o poor risk med- 
ical school applicant. Numerous reasons are offered as to why 
women are unlikely to complete their medical training and be- 
come practicing physicians. But despite these attitudes, more 
married women with families are pursuing medical careers, and 
inroads are slowly being made. At least now there is an oppor- 
tunity where there once was none. 

Being a wife and mother is gratifying, yet a career in medicine 
enhances this fulfillment and favors the achievement of a 
happy, productive, and useful life. 

Time is often at a premium, especially in our household, where 
the mother is a medical student and the father is an obstetri- 
cian-gynecologist. Understanding, tolerance, and patience are 
essential on the part of all the family members. 

I can say that the past four years have been enjoyable, thanks 
to the help from my husband and son. It has been taxing at 
times, but anything worth having usually is. I feel it is important 
to make a commitment and then use the available resources to 
achieve that goal. 



Llu^-% LhtsJZj 



118 









j-m 



~L **i 







121 





•-*^» 




122 




the class of 1976 



123 




JAMES P. ALMAS 
B.A., Stanford 
1972 








SOLY BAREDES 






B.A., 


Columbia 
1972 


RAYMOND L. AZZI 




B.S., 


M.I.T., 


1972 






A. STEVEN BARNETT 
B.A., Oberlin, 1972 





LISA GWENDOLYN 

BARBERA 

B.S., Yasser, 1 972 



CHARLES M. BLATT 
B.A., Harvard, 1972 




124 




JOHN ANDREW BOWE 
B.S., Pennsylvania 
1972 



ALLAN BURKE 

B.A., Haverford 

1971 





RICHARD LAWRENCE 

BRONZO 

B.A., Hofstra, 1 972 



DOROTHY V. 

CALABRESE 

B.A., N.Y.U., 1972 





LARRY K. BROWN 
B.S., Maryland 
1972 



DANIEL B. CARR 

B.A., Columbia 

1968 




125 




CHRISTINA B. 
CASALS-ARIET 
B.A., Fordham 
1972 



FLORENCE Y. CHAN 

B.S., Minnesota 

1972 





THOMAS CASTELLANO 

B.A., Harvard 

1972 



CYNTHIA McCLENNON 

CHARITY 

B.A., Vanderbilt 

1969 




J 




KENNETH CERNY 
B.A., Cornell 
1972 



JEAN MARGUERITE 

CHIN 

B.A., Hollins 

1972 




126 




YONG S. CHYUN 
B.A., Case Western 
Reserve, 1972 



RONALD S. COHEN 

B.A., Columbia 

1972 





MARY H. CLARK 
B.A., Middlebury 
1971 






KENNETH 
B.A., 


H. COHN 

Rochester 

1972 


MICHELLE OLIVETTE 

CLARK 

B.A., Hunter, 1972 






ROBERT L. DANIELS 

B.A., Princeton 

1972 




127 




JEFFREY M. DAVIS 
B.A., Princeton 
1972 



CATHERINE ENG 

B.A., Wellesley 

1972 





LAWRENCE DILLER 
B.A., Clark, 1 972 



NANCY EPSTEIN 

B.A., Barnard 

1972 





JAMES V. DUNFORD, Jr. 

B.A., Syracuse 

1972 



JOSEPH M. FAZIO 

B.A., Holy Cross 

1971 




128 




EDWARD S. FELDMAN 

B.A., Harvard 

1972 



IRA JAY FOX 
B.A., Harvard, 1972 





CORNELIUS FLOWERS 
B.S., Southern 
Mississippi, 1 972 



DAVID HALL FRASZ 

B.A., Princeton 

1968 





SUSAN H. FORSTER 
B.A., Radcliffe 
1972 




LINDA NANCY FREEMAN 

B.A., Pennsylvania 

1972 






129 




EMANUEL FRIEDMAN 
B.S., Newark College 
of Engineering 
1972 



EDMUND A. GELLER 
B.A., N.Y.U., 1972 





YEE FUNG 
B.S.E., Princeton 
1972 



DAVID A. GILDER 

B.A., Harvard 

1972 





JAY M. GALST 
B.S., Wisconsin 
1972 



PATRICIA EILEEN 

GILHOOLY 

B.A., Manhattanville 

1972 




i «A 




BRENT W. GINSBERG 
B.A., Princeton 
1972 



ANDREW MILTON 

GOLDMANN 

B.A., Cornell, 1972 





BERT M. GLASER 
B.A., N.Y.U., 1970 



FREDERICK A 

GONZALEZ 

B.A., Boston, 1972 





STEPHEN E. GLINICK 
B.A., Bowdoin 
1971 



TONEY GRAHAM, JR. 
B.S., Clcflin, 1972 




131 




ROSALIE GREENBERG 
B.A., N.Y.U., 1972 



GARY GROSS 

B.A., Swarthmore 

1970 





PETER KIM GREGERSEN 
B.S., Johns Hopkins 
1972 



HARRY EDWARD 

GWIRTSMAN 

B.A., Yale, 1972 





JEROME ELLIOT 
GROOPMAN 
B.A., Columbia 
1972 



HUNTER A. HAMMILL 

B.S., Boston College 

1971 





MADELEINE HARBISON 
B.A., Wellesley 
1971 



^^m 



JOYCE ILSON 

B.S., City College 

1972 





JOHN S. HOPPOCK 
B.A., Princeton 
1968 



ANDREW GLENN ISRAEL 

B.A., Stanford 

1972 





SHEPARD HURWITZ 
B.A., Columbia 
1972 



MATTEETHRA C. JACOB 

B.S.E.E., Madras 

1970. M.S., Imperial 

College (London), 1971 




133 




JUDITH JAFFE 
B.A., Barnard 
1972 



STUART KALMANOWITZ 

B.A., Princeton 

1972 





^ 






A £J 






BABATUNDE A. JINADU 
B.S., Central State 
(Ohio), 1972 



GEORGE ISAAC KARP 

B.A., Columbia 

1972 








CHARLES E. 
JOHNSTON, II 
B.A., Yale, 1971 



JONATHAN D. KAUNITZ 

B.A., Columbia 

1972 





THOMAS KINASZCZUK, JR. 

B.A., Princeton 

1972 



JAMES JOSEPH KUCHERA 

B.S., Scranton 

1972 





BETH KOSTER 
B.A., Smith, 1973 



ESTHER HO KUNG 
B.A., Hunter, 1972 





MARVIN ROY 

KREMBERG 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1972 



PAMELA A. LAWRENCE 

B.A., Stanford 

1968 




W 'I 




MARY ELLEN LEDER 
B.A., Rochester 
1972 



STANLEY A. LOPYAN 
Queens College 





JAY H. LEFKOWITCH 
B.A., Clark, 1972 



BARBARA R. LOWE 
B.S., Tufts, 1972 





BRUCE E. LEITER 
B.S., Dartmouth 
1972 



M. PHILIP LUBER 

B.A., Pennsylvania 

1972 





JEANNE MANDELBLATT 
B.A., Southern 
California, 1972 



MARGUERITE B. 

MCDONALD jl, 

B.A., Manhattanville ■■ ■.'•'? '.■fe&sfife'* « @\ 

1 972 &x ■ :.-■:% ® \Vigmi>iff& 





JOSE M. MARCAL 
B.A., Hamilton 
1972 



STEPHEN A. McGUIRE 

B.S., Idaho, 1970 

M.S., Michigan 

State, 1972 





HARRY J. MARSHALL 
B.S., M.I.T., 1969 



JAMES W. McNALLY 
B.S., M.I.T., 1972 




137 




FRANCIS MENDOZA 
B.S., Polytechnic 
Institute of 
Brooklyn, 1968 
M.S., N.Y.U., 1970 



WILLIAM A. 

MITCHELL, JR. 

B.A., Penn State 

1972 





WOODSON C. MERRELL 
B.A., Amherst, 1971 



ROGER C. MIXTER 
B.A., Amherst, 1971 





ROBERT A. MEYERS 
B.A., Dartmouth 
1972 



PHILIP M. MOUNT 

B.A., Oberlin, 1963 

M.A., Wake Forest, 

1968. Ph.D., Tulane 

1972 





ALFRED I. NEUGUT 
B.A., Columbia 
1972 



O. HOWARD OGILVIE 
B.S., Utah, 1972 





WALTER L. NIEVES 
B.S., City College 
1972 



EMILIE H.S. OSBORN 

B.A., Radcliffe 

1969 





BRIAN T. NOLAN 
B.S., Yale, 1972 



HARRY OSTRER 
B.S., M.I.T., 1972 




139 




ANDREW J. PACKER 
B.A., Princeton 
1972 



WILLIAM P. PETERS 

B.S., B.S., B.A., 

Penn State, 1972 





SEBASTIAN T. PADRON 
B.A., Indiana, 1971 



MALCOLM CHARLES 

PHILLIPS 

B.A., Amherst, 1972 





ONEALL E. PARRIS 
B.S., Yale, 1 972 



CLIFFORD M. RATNER 
B.A., Pennsylvania 
1967 




140 




MARIO F. ROMAGNOLI 
B.S., Fordham, 1972 



SARAN S. ROSNER srgj] 
B.A., Dartmouth i''lx£ 

1972 ' :#:;^ Ki 





STEPHEN M. ROSENTHAL 
B.A., Yale, 1972 



MARVIN I. RUDERMAN 

B.A., Pennsylvania 

1972 





MEL ROSENWASSER 
B.A., Johns Hopkins 
1972 



JANE SALMON 
B.A., N.Y.U., 1972 





GUILLERMO R. 
SANCHEZ 
B.S., Seton Hall 
1966. Ph.D., 
Columbia, 1970 



HARRY DAVID 

SCHNEIDER 

B.A., City College, 

1966. M.A., Queens 

1971. Ph.D., City 

College, 1972 





CLYDE SCHECHTER 
B.A., Columbia 
1967 



LOUISA BEA SCHNEIDER 
B.S., Queens, 1971 





ROBERT L. SCHIFFMAN 
B.A., Harvard, 1 972 



MICHAEL J. SCHNUR 
B.A., N.Y.U., 1972 





ROBERT T. SCHOEN 
B.A., Harvard, 1972 



DAVID SILVERMAN 

B.A., Columbia 

1972 





ROBERT SCHULTZ 
B.S., Notre Dame, 
1972 



ALFRED ABE 

STEINBERGER 

B.S., City College, 

1972 





ELAINE CAROLE 

SHOJI 

B.S., California 

(Irvine), 1972 



MICHAEL STERNSCHEIN 
B.A., Oberlin, 1970 




143 




STEVEN A. STUCHIN 
B.A., Yale, 1972 



ROBERT P. TURNER 

B.A., Princeton 

1972 





NEIL S. TALON 
B.A., Michigan 
1972 



PHILIP C. URSELL 

B.A., Haverford 

1972 





HOWARD TAYLOR 
B.S., Hobart, 1 972 



MARY E.L. VERNON 

B.S., South Carolina 

State, 1972 





FRANK A. VETERAN 
B.A., Harvard, 1972 



KAMEHAMEHA K. WONG 

B.A., Johns Hopkins 

1972 





ELIZABETH ANN 

WELCH 

B.A., N.Y.U., 1972 



JOHN WOOD 

B.A., Columbia 

1972 





GREGORY A. WILLETS 
B.A., Wisconsin 
1972 



PHILLIPA G. 

WOODRIFFE 

B.S., Molloy, 1972 




145 




MIKE YAREMCHUK 
B.A., Yale, 1 972 



JEREL ZOLTICK 
B.A., Princeton 
1972 





JOHN YERGAN 

B.A., Columbia 

1972 



NOT PICTURED 

Barbara L. Binkert 
Barry Breaux 
Barry G. Chaiken 
David M. Chernock 
Eric J. Drimmer 
Warren O. Ferris 
Louis Jimenez 
Joseph P. Kleaveland 
Robert A. Rosenberg 
Paul C. Ruestow 
Douglas J. Van der Heide 



MEDICAL SCIENTIST TRAINING 

PROGRAM 

Students Graduating in 1 978 

Alfred I. Neugut 
William P. Peters 
Robert A. Rosenberg 
Jane E. Salmon 



146 



NATIONAL BOARD OF 
MEDICAL EXAMINERS 




As a service to those persons who have not yet taken Part II of the National 
Boards, the Editors of the 1 976 Yearbook are reproducing a section of this exam 
without permission from the National Board of Medical Examiners. In order that 
this test be of value to you, there must be strict adherance to the directions and 
regulations. You will have 30 msec, to complete this section of the examination. If 
you finish before your time is up, you may go to the bathroom. An answer sheet is 
provided on the next page. Do not be alarmed if your answer sheet contains more 
numbers than there are questions. You will NOT be penalized for guessing on 
those answers to which there are no questions. 



DIRECTIONS 
For each statement, ONE or MORE of the completions given is 
correct. On the answer sheet, fill in the circle containing 

A if only 1 , 2 and 3 are correct 

B if only 1 and 3 are correct 

C if only 2 and 4 are correct 

D if only 4 is correct 

E if all are correct 

SAMPLE QUESTION 
The heart is an organ of which system(s). 



1 . Reproductive 

2. Nervous system 

3. Digestive system 

4. The Soviet State Police 



The correct answer, of course, is B ( 1 and 3). 
You could not copulate or eat without your heart. 



GO 



Q539fol b L5Ma. 



National Board of Medical Examiners 
please ailor in the following: 

NAME 



last 



middle 



first 



Tortile Answer (?) Sheet 

£f your narne is longer than, number 
of box.es. included -£o bacl ! 



Address rTTT TTITTTTT TTTTTI I 1 I 11 / 

Yea.r of study Q\» Uz* Dr 1 D^Ds* 04*07*0 ** D^a^Qi^n 12 

Social security numt>er | I M I | J I I 1 I I 

Pet dog's registry number (where appropriate) I I 1 I I I I I J 

Career interest ' D Urology D /Vnestraesiology □ Other 

/?ea&ons lor entering medicine : D Prestige- Q Financial reward 

D Pushy parents D Other 
Best finding on a recent physical exam you did •■ D 5^ gallop D Clubbing 
Q Papilledema. d Chancre D Bruit D Apnea- 



X, 



•8 



■ Answers -(or this section are to be filled in tcZo-w. You. will find not enoutfi 
Spaces available for the numter of Questions asKed. This £dves you. a mediocre 
score to start with, and we thereby "have you. o\re,r a "barrel. 

• We assume, most <?P your answers are ^tiesses , so ii goes without iayi: 
that you- should 6-uew where, unsure of proper response. 

■ Vflert is -usaaJiy only one correct answer, however, there may be five] 

Fill iw boxes below.- 

o o o o o 

O O O O O 

o oo o o 
o o o o o 



My gue&s is "■ 


l. 


a *OcO doq3 


34. 




2. 


O O O O O 


i7 




3. 


o o o o 


a*. 




1- 


o o O o 


*?■ 




s. 


o o o o o 


to. 




fc. 


o o o o o 


ff. 




7- 


O O o o o 


T2. 




?. 


o o o o o 


fe 




9. 


o o o o o 


w 



since they are 
probably too 
clirfidult for 

you.. 



Quesbcns li _^- O O O O O 
ten Sited . 5 .ooooo 
u. o o o o o 
27. o o o o o 
2?. o o o o o 
2.9. o o o o o 

*>. O O O O O 

31. o o o o o 
33. o o o o o 
»• o o o o o 

HO O O O O 

5 s - o o o o o 



o o o o o 

o o o o o 

o o o o o 

o o o c o 

O o o o o 

t>. o o o o o 

4fe. O o o o o 

«. o o o o o 

<f* o o o o o 

r?- O O O 

5c. O O O O 

5i. o o o O O 

5i. o o o o o 

53.0 O OOO 

5-4. O O o o o 



Sample ffttesbion : 
TV«e term "Lues" reftt-& tr> a 
disease. 

a. ft«t described by 
Louella Parsons 

fc>. O Endemic to jpech'ca.1 stde** 
C TransmittEd by asino dirty 
finger bowls. 

d # None of the. above . 



To be filled in by Student: 
DoodlinA space. 






SUMMARY OF DIRECTIONS 




A 


B C D 


E ' 


1,2,3 


1,3 2,4 4 


ALL CORRECT 



1 . Study the photograph of the patient 
on the right, and choose the correct 
answer(s). 

1 . This is a simple case of Thrush in a 
young medical student. 

2. This is a patient who, among other 
problems, has a typical Gilles de la 
Tourette's disease, refractory to 
Haloperidol. 

3. This patient could be helped by 
long term Lithium therapy. 

4. A complete work up of this patient 
would include inspection of his 
gummas. 




2. The patient shown here in the 
"Drinker" is receiving therapeutic 
transnasal aspiration. The physician 
appears to be 

1 . Sadistic 

2. A sadomasochist 

3. A chiropractor 

4. Kind and gentle 






SUMMARY OF DIRECTIONS 


A 


B C D E 


1,2,3 


1,3 2,4 4 ALL CORRECT 




3. The slide shown here under the miscroscope 
represents: 

1. Artifact 

2. A mutant strain of Aspergillus 

3. Highly differentiated testicular seminoma 

4. Giardia gambinolosis 





SUMMARY OF DIRECTIONS 


A 


B C D E 


1,2,3 


1,3 2,4 4 ALL CORRECT 



4. You ore a first year resident in Neurology, 
and are presenting a patient with Wilson's 
Disease. During the presentation you real- 
ize that you have forgotten the most re- 
cent ceruloplasm level. You should . . . 

1 . Asked to be excused for pressing per- 
sonal reasons. 

2. Wait until you are asked, then 
say: "Ceruloplasm?!? What's that?" 

3. Insist that the serum procelain level is 
80. 

4. Say "They don't do ceruloplasms at 
night at this hospital." 




You are in the Coronary Care Unit one 
night in a small hospital in Alaska, when 
you notice that the EKG on your patient 
shows 3 per second spike and wave 
forms. You should . . . 

1. Tell the nurse, "we control the horizon- 
tal, you control the vertical!" 

2. Change the channel. 

3. Diagnose atrial fibrillation and treat 
with rectal exams (ie. digitalize) 

4. Shout "ARREST, STAT, Presbyterian 
Hospital, 9th floor ..." 




152 



SUMMARY OF DIRECTIONS 



ABC 
1,2,3 1,3 2,4 



D E 

4 ALL CORRECT 




6. You are a physician in the Department of Medicine at a large 
metropolitan hospital. A 26 year old woman comes to you for 
a routine physical examination. During the exam she begins to 
cry and tells you that she has never experienced orgasm. You 
should . . . 

1 . Set a date between the patient and your Chief Resident. 

2. Call the patient's husband to ask him to try harder. 

3. Send the patient to the Psychiatry clinic where she will be 
treated by a second year medical student. 

4. Tell her, "I'm sorry lady, but that's not my problem." 



STOP 



153 



1976 yearbook staff 



co-editors-in-chief 

and 
photography editors 



Patricia E. Gilhooly 
Marvin I. Ruderman 



business manager 




and 


Catherine Eng 


associate editor 




COVER AND ARTWORK 


JAY LEFKOWITCH 


CONTRIBUTORS 




EMILIE OSBORN 


TOM KINASZCZUK 


STEPHEN GLINICK 


MARIO ROMAGNOLI 


GUILLERMO SANCHEZ 


MELVIN ROSENWASSER 


RONALD COHEN 


CLYDE SCHECHTER 


JUDITH JAFFE 




BABATUNDE JINADU 






The past four years of our lives at P & S seem to have gone by 
with incredible speed. During this time we changed from a group of 
first year medical students all taking the same courses at the same 
hours to a very diversified body of physicians pursuing different 
medical careers with different life-styles. As we move farther away 
from this stage in our lives, our years together as students will 
seem remote, and perhaps more nostalgic. 

The purpose of this yearbook has been to capture some of our 
joint memories and preserve them primarily for our classmates. As 
you may know, the yearbook had been discontinued at P & S after 
1970, following 24 years of publication. When we initiated work 
on this book three years ago, our feelings were that the endeavor 
was worth our time and effort. We have learned that it was no 
small effort, and required a great deal of time. Many long hours 
have gone into the photography, photographic processing, layout, 
type sheets, and proof-reading, to mention only a part of the job. 
It was our hope to include as many candid photographs of every- 
one in our class and of as many faculty as possible. Unfortunately, 
due to circumstances beyond our control, our intent was not fully 
realized. However, there have been no intentional omissions. 

We would like to extend our thanks to those contributors who 
helped with various stages. We are grateful to Cathy Eng who 
acted as our sole assistant during much of the seeming eternity in- 
vovled in the production of the layout pages and typesheets. 

We wish to thank the Public Relations Office for the use of a 
number of their photographs. We thank Carol Studios, Inc. and 
photographer Joe Gagliano for the excellent class photographs. 
The Alumni Association has been most helpful and we gratefully 
acknowledge the support they have given the yearbook. Additional 
thanks to Dr. John Lattimer and Dr. Stanford Pulrang for their his- 
torical perspective. We are deeply appreciative of the advertising 
support rendered by Sidney A. Sass Associates, Inc., and we wish 
to thank the Bookstore as well for their support. Our thanks to Miss 
Johanna Farley and the P & S Club for the generous assistance in 
the early stages of the planning of the book. Dr. Ann S. Peterson 
has always been encouraging to us and we thank her for her assis- 
tance in contacting our classmates by mail. We also thank Tony at 
the P & S Information Desk for his help with our mail. The assis- 
tance of Herff-Jones Yearbooks and representative Tom Swift was 
appreciated. 

Finally, this yearbook could not have been published without the 
enthusiastic support of those parents and faculty members who 
acted as our Sponsors. We especially wish to thank President Wil- 
liam McGill for his generous contribution to the Yearbook. 









"If you don't mind, Pat , just process the 

films without philosophizing aloud uhout the empty 

dreary lives they record." 



SPONSORS 



Dr. and Mrs. D.J. Almas 

Dr. Henry Aranow, Jr. 

Dr. David H. Baker 

Harold G. Barker, M.D. 

Arthur M. Barnett 

Milos Basek, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. William A. Bauman 

Dr. Richard Behrman 

H.H. Bendixen, M.D. 

Dr. Frederick O. Bowman, Jr. 

John Bryant, M.D. 

Sidney B. Burke, M.D. 

Vincent P. Butler, M.D. 

Charles J. Campbell, M.D. 

Dorothy W. Castellano 

Bernard H. Chaiken, M.D. 

Bernard Challenor, M.D. 

Dr. Shu Chien 

Drs. Charles and Margaret Clark 

Wilburforce Clark, Jr. 

Louis Z. Cooper, M.D. 

Edward C. Curnen, Jr., M.D. 

Lawrence Daniels 

Felix E. Demartini, M.D. 

H.M. Dick, M.D. 

John A. Downey, M.D. 

Robert M. Ellsworth, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Carl R. Feind 

Dr. A.L. Feldman 

Andrew G. Frantz, M.D. 

Henry Clay Frick, II, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Gambino 

Glenda Garvey, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Geller 

Welton M. Gersony, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Gilhooly 

Sid Gilman, M.D. 

Harold S. Ginsberg, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Glinick 



Mr. and Mrs. David Gold 

Dr. DeWitt S. Goodman 

Susan G. Gordon, M.D. 

Dr. Albert Grokoest 

Groopman Family 

Ruth T. Gross, M.D. 

David V. Habif, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. James F. Hammill 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Harbison 

Dr. F.G. Hofmann 

E.M. Housepian, M.D. 

Robert M. Hui, M.D. 

Herbert Jaffe, Inc. 

Austin D. Johnston, M.D. 

Dr. Norman Kahn 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul E. Kaunitz 

Dr. and Mrs. John M. Kinney 

Lawrence C. Kolb, M.D. 

Donald S. Kornfeld, M.D. 

Dr. Seymour Koster 

Robert S. Krooth, M.D. 

Dr. John K. Lattimer 

Edgar Leifer, M.D. 

Laban W. Leiter, M.D. 

Dr. John N. Loeb 

Rochelle Lopyan 

Dr. and Mrs. Martin Lorin 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark H. Luber 

William J. McGill 

Sidney Malitz, M.D. 

Paul Marks, M.D. 

George W. Melcher, Jr. 

Jay I. Meltzer, M.D. 

W. Jost Michelsen, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. William A. Mitchell 

Councilman Morgan, M.D. 

Thomas Q. Morris, M.D. 

Charles S. Neer, II, M.D. 

Dr. Mero R. Nocenti 



Dr. H.L. Nossel 

Dr. Ann S. Peterson 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Phillips 

Kermit L. Pines, M.D. 

Kathryn F. Prescott, M.D. 

C.A. Ragan, Jr., M.D. 

Keith Reemtsma, M.D. 

Mario Romagnoli 

Matilda Romagnoli 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rosenwasser 

Samuel Rosner, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ruderman 

Thomas V. Santulli, M.D. 

Joseph F. Schultz 

Daniel Sciarra, M.D. 

William B. Seaman, M.D. 

Harold F. Spalter, M.D. 

Alex Steinberger 

Frank E. Stinchfield, M.D. 

Dr. Robert J. Stock 

F.C. Symonds, M.D. 

John V. Taggart, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Talon 

Donald F. Tapley, M.D. 

Gerard M. Turino, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard G. Turner 

Anthony E. Veteran 

Carmine T. Vicale, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. T.H. Welch 

Walter A. Wichern, Jr., M.D. 

Philip D. Wiedel, M.D. 

Susan Williamson, M.D. 

Dr. Myron Winick 

Samuel David Winner, M.D. 

Marianne Wolff, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Woodriffe 

Dr. B.A. Zikria 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

COLLEGE 

OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS 

AND A 
WARM WELCOME 



TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS- 
THE CLASS OF 1976 







%ik &aM<f/976 

SIDNEY A. SASS ASSOCIATES INC 



ADMINISTRATORS OF 



the OFFICIAL GROUP 
INSURANCE PROGRAMS 

for the Alumni Association 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Columbia University 

FEATURING THE ENDORSED LOW-COST 

... LIFE INSURANCE PLAN 

... INCOME PROTECTION PLAN 



AND OTHERS 

747 THIRD AVENUE NEW YORK, N.Y. 1 001 7 



212-751-4606 




We al Columbia Medical Center 
Bookstore extend our Congratulations to 
the members of the class of 1979. We also 
hope that our books will help you build a 
firm foundation for your future careers. 
Come into our store and let's gel ac- 
quainted. We will do our best to help make 
the transition through your medical educa- 
tion as smooth as possible. 
The Columbia University 

Medical Center J^£? Bookstore 



r &NOBLE' 



vledital Cenler 650 W. 168 Slreet Nc 



3fk 10032 Tel (2121 571-1044 



Services: An extensive selection of 
the most currenl meciic.il textbooks, stationery, 
microscopes and our text buy Luck service . ire only 
some of the ways we try lo make the coming years 
a little easier fur you, 



oath of hippocrates 

I swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, 
and Hygeia, and Panacea, and all the gods and god- 
desses, that according to my ability and judgment I will 
keep this oath and this stipulation: to reckon him who 
taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, 
to share my substance with him and relieve his neces- 
sities if required; to look upon his offspring as my own 
brothers and to teach them this Art, if they shall wish 
to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by pre- 
cept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction I will 
impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons and 
those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a sti- 
pulation and oath according to the law of medicine, 
but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen 
JpMkhich according to my ability and judgment I consider 
for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from what- 
ever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no 
deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any 
such counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a 
woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and 
with holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I 
will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but will 
leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of 
this work. Into whatever houses I enter I will go into 
them for the benefit of the sick and will abstain from 
every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and 
further, from the seduction of females and m _l - 
freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connect 1- * 
professional practice or not in connecti|^B . . 

or hear in the life of men which ough^B to be spoken 
of abroad. I will not divulge, as reaj| lg that all such 
should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this 
oath unviolated may it be granted to me^to enjoy life 
and the practice of the Art, respected by all men and 
all times. But should I trespass and violate this oath 
may the reverse be my lot. 













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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



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